SAT Grammar Tips | Subject Predicate | Simple Compound Complex Sentences | AKV Tutorials

In this article of AKVTutorials, you will get SAT Grammar Tips | Subject Predicate | Simple Compound Complex Sentences | AKV Tutorials.

SAT Grammar Tips

Subject and Predicate

As you have well known about the sentences. Now, every sentence has two parts: subject and predicate.

Subject

The part of the sentence which names the person or thing we are talking about is known as Subject of sentence. The subject may consist of one word or several words.

Predicate

The part of the sentence which tells something about the subject is known as the Predicate of the sentence. The predicate may consists of one word or several words. 

For example:

SubjectPredicate
Dogsbarks.
The sungives light.
The childis happy.
The flamesspread everywhere.
The hour to prepare lessons has arrived.

SAT Grammar Tips 6: The subject of a sentence usually comes first, but in some sentences, it comes after predicate. 

For example:

Down went the George.

Sweet are the uses of adversity.

SAT Writing Grammar Rules 7: When the subject consists of several words, there is always one word in it which is more important than other words. This is called Subject Word or Simple Subject. The simple subject is always a noun, or a group of words that work as a noun. In a complete subject, the simple subject is qualified by an adjective is called its Attribute

For example:

Observe the following sentences.

1. New brooms sweep clean.

2. Barking dogs seldom bite.

3. Hari’s father is an engineer.

4. My views are quite different. 

In these four sentences, the simple-subject, attribute and predicate as below.

SubjectPredicate
Simple SubjectAttribute
broomsNewsweep clean.
dogsBarkingseldom bite.
FatherHari’sis an engineer.
viewsmyare quite different.

SAT Grammar Tips 8: When the predicate consists of one word is always a verb, and when the predicate consist of several word, then the essential word in the predicate is always a verb. Like simple subject, the verb in predicate is also qualified by an adverb.

For example:

Observe the following sentences.

1. The flames spread everywhere.

2. He went home.

3. He rose to go.

4. Spring advancing, the sallow appear.

In these four sentences, the simple-subject, attribute and predicate as below.

SubjectPredicate
Simple SubjectAttributeVerbAdverb
flamesThespreadeverywhere.
Hewenthome.
He roseto go.
swallowsTheappearspring everywhere.

Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences

A sentence which have only one subject and one predicate is called Simple Sentence. A simple sentence has only one finite verb (a verb which is according to number and person of the subject in a sentence is known as finite verb).

For example:

He heard a noise.

He got up.

You will win the election.

Now, let another example;

The moon was bright and we could see our way.

In this sentence, there are two parts. First part is ‘The moon was bright.’ and second part is ‘We could see our way.’.

These two parts are joined by a conjunction ‘and’. Each part has its own subject and predicate, hence each part is independent of each other.

Thus, each part is known as Main Clause.

Therefore, a sentence which is made up of two or more main clauses is known as Compound Sentence.

Now, let another example;

They rested when evening came.

In this sentence, ‘They rested’ makes a good sense and hence can stand by itself as a complete sentence. This part of sentence is called Principal Clause or Main Clause.

While other part of the sentence ‘when evening came.’, cannot stand by itself and it is dependent on the main clause ‘They rested’. Thus, this part of the sentence is called Dependent or Subordinate Clause. Therefore, a sentence consisting of one Main clause and one or more subordinate clause is known as Complex Sentence.

Synthesis: Simple, Compound & Complex Sentences

In synthesis, we combined two or more simple sentences into one simple or one compound or one complex sentence. 

Synthesis of Two Simple Sentences into One Simple Sentence

SAT Grammar Tips 9: Two simple sentences are combined to form one simple sentence. In simple sentence, there is one subject and its one finite verb.

For example:

Two Separate Simple SentencesOne Combined Simple Sentence
1. He heard a noise.
2. He got up.
Hearing a noise, he got up.
1. He has three sons.
2. He has to educate them.
He has three sons to educate.
1. You will win the election.
2. That is certain.
You will certainly win the election.

Synthesis of Two Simple Sentences into One Compound Sentence

SAT Grammar Tips 10: Two simple sentences are combined to form a compound sentence. To make a compound sentences, if there are two or more main clause, then put subject + verb in each clause, and also you can use the following connectors to make a compound sentence.

Connectors words:

and, still, however, or, yet, neverthless, but, not, therefore, both…and, neither…nor, not only….but also. 

For example:

Two Separate Simple SentencesOne Combined Compound Sentence
1. I went to the fair.
2. I did not buy anything.
I went to the fair but did not buy anything.
1. Tom got up.
2. He went to the post office.
Tom got up and went to the post office.
1. You can have a tea.
2. You can have a coffee.
You can have a tea or coffee.

Synthesis of Two Simple Sentences into One Complex Sentence

SAT Grammar Tips 11: Two simple sentences are combined to form a complex sentence. To make a complex sentence, whatever be the number of main clause, there is at least one subordinate clause and this may be adjective clause, adverb clause, noun clause.

Subordinate clause (Adjective clause) Words: who, which, whom, that, whose, why, etc.

Subordinate clause (Adverb clause) Words: if, when, while, though, although, so, as, before, after, because, until, since etc.

Subordinate clause (Noun clause) Words: that, whether, what, if etc.

For example:

Two Separate Simple SentencesOne Complex Compound Sentence
1. I went there.
2. The door was locked.
When I went there, the door was locked.
1. This is the letter.
2. Mukul wrote it.
This is the letter which Mukul wrote.
1. I was right.
2. The teacher told me this.
The teacher told me that I was right.

SAT Grammar Tips 12: Sometimes the complex sentence can be formed from two simple sentences using ‘And’, ‘as well as’, ‘both…and’, ‘not only…but also’.

For example:

Two Separate Simple SentencesOne Complex Compound Sentence
1. I finished my breakfast.
2. I went for a walk.
I finished my breakfast and went for a walk.
1. Moti was punished.
2. Hari was punished.
Moti as well as Hari was punished.
1. Tom was fined.
2. Tom was expelled.
Tom was not only fined but also expelled.

SAT Grammar Tips 13: Sometimes the complex sentence can be formed from two simple sentences using ‘or’, ‘nor’ ‘neither’, ‘else’, ‘otherwise’, ‘either…or’, ‘neither…nor’.

For example:

Two Separate Simple SentencesOne Complex Compound Sentence
1. He does not play football.
2. He does not play cricket.
He does not play football nor does he play cricket.
1. Tom does not drink.
2. He does not drink.
Tome does not smoke neither does he drink.
1. Alex can do it.
2. Tom can do it.
Either Alex or Tom can do it.
1. The banks are not open today.
2. The post offices are not open today.
Neither the banks nor the post offices are open today.

SAT Grammar Tips 14: In some cases, the complex sentence can be formed from two simple sentences using ‘Therefore’, ‘so’, ‘for’, ‘consequently’, ‘hence’. 

For example:

Two Separate Simple SentencesOne Complex Compound Sentence
1. He was found guilty.
2. he was hanged.
He was found guilty, therefore, he was hanged.
1. It was getting dark.
2. We went home.
It was getting dark, so we went home.
1. We will die one day.
2. All men are mortal.
We will die one day, for all men are mortal.
1. They would not believe me.
2. I had to give them proofs.
They would not believe me, consequently I had to give them proofs.

SAT Grammar Tips 15: When two nouns are compared in a sentence, then you need to use the words “as … as”, “so … as” or “than” to make a complex sentence. When an equality is represented in a sentence, then you need to use “as … as” to make a complex sentence. When a negative comparison of equality is in a simple sentence, then you need to use “not so … as” or not “as … as” to make a complex sentence.

For example:

Two Separate Simple SentencesOne Complex Compound Sentence
1. She is pretty.
2. Her sister is pretty.
She is as pretty as her sister.
1. She did not run quickly.
2. Her sister ran quickly.
She did not run so quickly as her sister.
1. This book is easier
2. That book is easy.
This book is easier than that book.

SAT Grammar Tips 16: To make a complex sentence from two or more simple sentence, you need to use the words “Who”, “Whom”, “Whose”, “Which”, “That”.

The word “who” and “whom” are used for noun (person).

The word “whose” is used for noun (person) and non-living things.

 

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