Hi SAT aspirants, welcome to AKVTutorials. As you know that SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) is a standard test, used for taking admission to undergraduate programs of universities or colleges of the United States. SAT is developed and published by the College Board, an organization in the United States, administered by the Educational Testing Service. In this article of  you will get The Complete Guide to SAT Reading | Practice Comprehension Passage Online Test.

This article is the conclusion of the complete guide of SAT reading book, written by Erica L. Meltzer. So let’s understand one by one guide how to solve SAT reading passage type comprehensive questions.

In SAT Reading section of SAT exam, there are four long single passages having 500 to 750 words and one set of shorter paired passages.

First passage of SAT Reading is all about Fiction.

Second passage is all about Social Science.

Third passage is about Natural Science.

Last Passage is a type of Historical Documents.

The Complete Guide to SAT Reading Tips

There are following SAT Reading Tips which you should follow. 

SAT Reading Tips 1: In SAT Reading practice questions, you need to read the passage carefully to understand an author’s argument as well as the rhetorical role or function that various pieces of information play in creating that argument.

Remember on thing at the time of SAT Reading questions solving, the answer is not always in the SAT Reading Passage.

SAT Reading Tips 2: Now, Read the introduction slowly until you figure out the point. Then, read the first and last sentence of each body paragraph carefully.

Finally, read the conclusion slowly and underline the last sentence or couple of sentences. This is the way where you will get the major points without losing time.

SAT Reading Tips 3: If the SAT Reading Comprehension is outstanding, you can simply move on to the next section of the passage.

SAT Reading Tips 4: When you turn to a new passage, start by through the questions.

SAT Reading Tips 5: Notice that some questions have specific lines references, then go to the passage and mark off those lines in the passage.

Note that, the answers to some questions will not be located directly in the lines referenced, for this you may need to read before or after in order to locate the necessary information.

SAT Reading Tips 6: if you have clear understanding about the SAT reading passage, then you need to pay close attention to the lines.

You may get the answer to the first question and those lines will be cited in the correct answer to the second question, allowing you to answer both questions simultaneously.

SAT Reading Tips 7: Suppose you have a lot of SAT reading practice, then you can answer the questions while you read the passage.

But it does have some potential drawbacks. Reading passages in bits can cause you to get lost in the details and lose sight of the argument.

In this method of Reading passages in bits, it can cause you to get lost in the details and lose sight of the argument.

SAT Reading Tips 8: In SAT Reading Passage, some sections are very important so you should read very slowly, while others are glanced over or even skipped.

Reading this way requires a lot more focus, and it should be faster and, when done properly, improves comprehension. For this, you need to know what to read slowly and what to skip, you must be able to recognize what is important.

SAT Reading Tips 9: In the SAT Reading comprehensive passage, observe the words or phrase like the ‘point’, ‘goal’, or ‘intention’, along with the word important and any of its synonyms (significant, crucial, key) and any italicized words.

You need to circle these words or phrases that indicate the author wants to say in the passage, and read that section carefully. If the author says it’s important, it’s important.

SAT Reading Tips 10: Now, focus where an argument changes or when new and important information is introduced. If one of these elements appears in or near a line reference, the answer will typically be located close by.

SAT Reading Tips 11: If there is line number is given in the question, then you need to go back to the passage and reread the lines. If the question seems to call for it, read from a sentence or two above to a sentence or two below.

SAT Reading Tips 12: Read the options answers choices carefully, A) through D), in order, given in the questions.

If there’s an option that contains the same essential idea you put down, choose it because it’s almost certainly right.  

SAT Reading Tips 13: Don’t spend to much time on each answer choice. You should cross out the answers that are absolutely wrong. If an option clearly makes no sense in context of the question or passage, then cross this option and don’t focus it on.

SAT Reading Tips 14: If you’re still stuck, skip it or guess. You can always come back to it later if you have time. And if you’re still stuck later on, you need to pick your favorite letter and fill it in. You should never leave anything blank. 

SAT Reading Tips 15: If you don’t have the habit of reading things written for educated adults, then start the practice now.

SAT Reading Tips 16: You can answer can with the help of both factually correct and wrong if that particular fact is not discussed in the passage.

But, it is always dependent upon ideas and debates that exist outside of the SAT.

The more you have outside knowledge about the world, the more easily you’ll be able to understand what you’re reading. And if you see an answer you know is factually correct, it can’t hurt to check it first.

SAT Reading Tips 17: Put your finger on the page, and bracket or underline as you read; the physical connection between your eye and your hand will force you to focus in a way you wouldn’t if you were just looking at the page.

You’re also far less likely to overlook key information.

SAT Reading Tips 18: Focus on the author what he/she want to say actually, not what she or he might be trying to say.

SAT Reading Tips 19: Answering SAT Reading questions is a process. SAT Reading questions is sometimes a process of trial-and-error.

You need to make an assumption based on how texts are usually put together and how the test is typically constructed, and much of the time it’ll turn out to be right.

SAT Reading Tips 20: Your goal should be deal with the smallest amount of information possible at any given time, and
looking at answers you’ve already eliminated.

If you get down to one option and it doesn’t seem to work, you can always erase the lines.

SAT Reading Tips 21: Sometimes you’ll be able to answer a question based on your general understanding of the passage and won’t need to reread anything.

Sometimes you’ll be able to go back to the passage, answer the question on your own, and then easily identify the correct answer when you look at the choices.

For more SAT Reading Tips: you should read the book “The Complete Guide to SAT Reading” book, written by Erica L. Meltzer.

SAT Reading Practice Test Comprehensive Passage 1

Now, practice the SAT Reading Sample Questions with Comprehensive passage as below.

In prosecuting the anti-slavery enterprise, we have been
asked to spare the church, to spare the ministry; but how, we
ask, could such a thing be done? We are met on the threshold
of our efforts for the redemption of the slave, by the church
Line 5and ministry of the country, in battle arrayed against us; and
we are compelled to fight or flee. From what quarter, I beg to
know, has proceeded a fire so deadly upon our ranks, during
the last to years, as from the Northern pulpit? As the
champions of oppressors, the chosen men of American
Line 10theology have appeared – men, honored for their so-called
piety, and their real learning. The Lords of Buffalo, the
Springs of New York, the Lathrops of Auburn, the Coxes and
Spencers of Brooklyn, the Gannets and Sharps of Boston, the
Deweys of Washington, and other great religious lights of the
Line 15land have, in utter denial of authority of Him by whom
they professed to be called to the ministry, deliberately taught
us, against the example or the Hebrews and against the
remonstrance of the Apostles, they teach that we ought to
obey man’s law before the law of God.
Line 20One is struck with the difference between the attitude of the
American church towards the anti-slavery movement, and
that occupied by the churches in England towards a similar
movement in that country. There, the church, true to its
mission of ameliorating, elevating, and improving the 
Line 25condition of mankind, came forwards promptly, bound up the
wounds of the West Indian slave, and restored him to his
liberty. There, the question of emancipation was a high
religious question. It was demanded, in the name of humanity,
and according to the law of the living God. The Sharps, the 
Line 30Clarksons, the Wilberforces, the Buxtons, and Burchells and
the Knibbs, were alike famous for their piety, and for their
philanthropy. The anti-slavery movement there was not an
anti-church movement, for the reason that the church took its
full share in prosecuting the movement: and the anti-slavery
Line 35movement in this country will cease to be anti-church
movement, when the church of this country shall assume a
favorable, instead of a hostile position towards that 
movement.
Americans! your republican politics, not less than your
Line 40republican religion, are flagrantly inconsistent. You boat of 
your love of liberty, your superior civilization, and your pure
Christianity, while the whole political power of the nation (as
embodied in the two great political parties), is solemnly
pledged to support and perpetuate the enslavement of three
Line 45millions of your countrymen. You hurl your anathemas at the
crowned headed tyrants of Russia and Austria, and pride
yourselves on your Democratic institutions, while you 
yourselves consent to be the mere tools and body-guards of
the tyrants of Virginia and Carolina. You invite to your shores
Line 50fugitive of oppression from abroad, honor them with
banquets, greet them with ovations, cheer them, toast them
salute them, protect them, and pour out your money to them
like water, but the fugitives from your own land you
advertise, hunt, arrest, shoot and skill. You glory in your
Line 55refinement and your universal education yet you maintain a
system as barbarous and dreadful as ever stained the
character of a nation – a system begun in avarice, supported
in pride, and perpetuated in cruelty. You shed tears over
fallen Hungary, and make the sad story of her wrongs the 
Line 60theme of your poets, statement and orators, till your gallant
sons are ready to fly to arms to vindicate her cause against
her oppressors; but in regards to the ten thousand wrongs of
the American slave, you would enforce the strictest silence,
and would hail him as an enemy of the nation who dares to
Line 65make those wrongs the subject of public discourse! You are
all on fire at the mention of liberty for France or for Ireland;
but are as cold as an iceberg at the thought of liberty for the
enslaved of America. You discourse eloquently on the dignity
of labor; yet you sustain a system which, in its very essence,
Line 70casts a stigma upon labor. You can brave your bosom to the
storm of British artillery to throw off a threepenny tax on tea;
and yet wring the last hard-earned farthing from the grasp of
the black laborers of your country. You profess to believe
“that, of one blood, God made all nations of men to dwell on
Line 75the of all the earth,” and hath commanded all men, 
everywhere to love one another; yet you notoriously hate,
(and glory in your hatred), all men whose skins are not
colored like your own. You declare, before the world, and are
understood by the world to declare, that you “hold these
Line 80truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal; and
are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights;
and that, among these are, life liberty, and the pursuit of
happiness” and yet, you hold securely, in a bondage which
according to your own Thomas Jefferson, “is worse than ages
Line 85of that which your fathers rose in rebellion to oppose” a
seventh part of the inhabitants of your country.
Fellow-citizens! I will not enlarge further on your national
inconsistencies. The existence of slavery in this country
brands your republicanism as a sham, your humanity as a 
Line 90base pretense, and your Christianity as a lie. It destroys your
moral power abroad; it corrupts your politicians at home. It
saps the foundation of religion; it makes your name a hissing,
and a bye-word to a mocking earth. It is the antagonistic
force in your government, the only thing that seriously
Line 95disturbs and endangers your Union. It fetters your progress;
it is the enemy of improvement, the deadly foe of education;
it fosters pride; it breeds insolence; it promotes vice; it
shelters crime; it is a curse to the earth that supports it; and
yet, you cling to it, as if it were the sheet anchor of all your
Line 100hopes. Oh! Be warned! A horrible reptile is coiled
up in your nation’s bosom; the venomous creature is nursing
at the tender breast of your youthful republic; for the love of 
God, tear away, and fling from you the hideous monster, and
let the weight of twenty millions crush and destroy it
Line 105forever!

SAT Reading Comprehension Practice Test Questions

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 1

The article is mainly about

Option A : pronouncing an action agenda

Option B : imploring to public discourse on a specific issue.

Option C : revealing some grave social anomalies

Option D : identifying several key factors for a plan

SAT Practice Test Answer No 1

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Option C : revealing some grave social anomalies

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 2

The author’s question in line 2-3 can be answered that

Option A : the churches of England should be the models for American ministries

Option B : the American churches couldn’t be pardoned for their stances in slavery

Option C : the Negroes suffered more from the regime than from the aloofness of churches

Option D : the battle for black rights should be rallied against the churches

SAT Practice Test Answer No 2

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Option B : the American churches couldn’t be pardoned for their stances in slavery

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 3

By the “Northern pulpit” in line 8, the author refers to 

Option A : the religious institutions of northern England

Option B : the ministries and churches of the free states of the America.

Option C : the priests serving on post for the churches across the nation.

Option D : the agencies and commissions comprised of religious figures.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 3

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Option B : the ministries and churches of the free states of the America.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 4

The word “champion” in line 9 has the closest

Option A : defendant

Option B : apologist

Option C : guardian

Option D : isolationist

SAT Practice Test Answer No 4

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Option B : apologist

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 5

In the passage, the author based his argument of the church positions towards slavery on

Option A : a careful enunciation of wrongdoings by some institutions.

Option B : a thorough theoretical analysis of logic within the decision process.

Option C : a comparison made with counterparts with similar circumstance.

Option D : a disclosure of the contradiction natures of certain actions.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 5

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Option C : a comparison made with counterparts with similar circumstance.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 6

In line 23, the article consider the England church’s truthfulness to its mission

Option A : an act that signifies the nobility of human kindness.

Option B : a true compassion to suffering of West Indian slaves.

Option C : a devout and humanistic act to oppose slavery as evil.

Option D : a sincere commitment to human freedom and liberty.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 6

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Option C : revealing some grave social anomalies

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 7

In line 40, the author deems the American republican religion to be “flagrantly inconsistent” because

Option A : the nature of liberty and civilization runs directly against the very existence of slavery.

Option B : the republican politics depends on the freeing of three millions slaves.

Option C : the anti-slavery movement improves, instead of undermining the founding principles of democracy.

Option D : churches of American would never tolerate harms done to the nation’s liberty.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 7

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Option A : the nature of liberty and civilization runs directly against the very existence of slavery.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 7

In the third paragraph, the author mainly relies on which of the following to make his case?

Option A : Resorting to logical arguments.

Option B : Designing an array of inquiries.

Option C : Illustrating by listing inconsistencies.

Option D : Analogizing with case of similar characteristics.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 8

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Option C : Illustrating by listing inconsistencies.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 9

The rhetoric strategy of lines 45-58 can be best described as 

Option A : satirizing the fallacies of certain action be exaggerating its effects.

Option B : employing dry humors to criticize certain trends of thinking.

Option C : contrasting the antics of human behaviors in many varieties of circumstances.

Option D : presenting the ironies in people’s actions in treating issues of similar natures differently.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 9

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Option D : presenting the ironies in people’s actions in treating issues of similar natures differently.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 10

Starting at line 70, the author’s discourse on the inconsistency of American views to liberty and slavery changes from 

Option A : an argument on unjustifiable actions to a theoretical analysis of its origins.

Option B : a mockery on the ironies of behaviors to drawing on historical references.

Option C : a horizontal comparison to a vertical and insightful criticism.

Option D : a discussion based on liberty principles to reasoning with theological inquiry.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 10

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Option B : a mockery on the ironies of behaviors to drawing on historical references.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 11

The statement quoted between line 79 and line 83 serves to

Option A : indicate the extent to which our values are violated and trampled.

Option B : prove that our Founding Fathers would have disagreed strongly with slavery.

Option C : suggest the churches should take on a favorable position towards anti-slavery.

Option D : show how the founding belief of this nation is contradicted.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 11

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Option D : show how the founding belief of this nation is contradicted.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 12

The author calls out for attentions in line 89 that the republicanism is a “sham” because

Option A : American’s positions to slavery do not agree with the pronounced principles.

Option B : the pretense shown by the American society has serious fallacies.

Option C : the moral power that American can show abroad is weakened by slavery.

Option D : the legitimacy of a nation builds upon its upholding of liberty instead of bondage.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 12

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Option A : American’s positions to slavery do not agree with the pronounced principles.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 13

The metaphor of reptile in the last paragraph indicates that

Option A : the public is never short of warning of its possible dangers.

Option B : the author is apprehensive of the nation’s future.

Option C : the greatest challenge faced by the nation resides within hearts of people.

Option D : the slavery wreaks a heavy burden on American conscientiousness.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 13

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Option B : the author is apprehensive of the nation’s future.

SAT Reading Practice Test Comprehensive Passage 2

Now, practice the SAT Reading Sample Questions with Comprehensive passage as below.

You retain your capital, and never labor, and yet live in
luxury on the labor of others. Capital commands labor, as 
the master does the slave. Neither pays for labor; but the
master permits the slave to retain a larger allowance from the
Line 5proceeds of his own labor, and hence “free labor is cheaper
than slave labor.” You, with the command over labor which
your capital gives you, are a slave owner – a master, without
the obligation of a master. They who work for you, who
create your income, are slaves, without the rights of slaves.
Line 10Slaves without a master! whilst you were engaged in
amassing your capital, in seeking to become independent, 
you were in the White Slave Trade. To become independent,
is to be able to make other people support you, without being
obliged to labor for them. Now, what man in society is not
Line 15seeking to attain this situation? He who attains it, is a
slaveowner, in the worst sense. He who is in pursuit of it, is
engaged in the slave trade. You, reader, belong to the one or
other class. The men without property, in free society, are
theoretically in a worse condition than slaves. Practically,
Line 20their condition corresponds with this theory, as history and 
statistics everywhere demonstrate. The capitalists, in free
society, live in ten times the luxury and show that Southern
masters do, because the slaves to capital work harder and
cost less, than Negro slaves
Line 25The Negro slaves of the South are the happiest, and, in some
sense, the freest people in the world. The Children and the
aged and infirm work not all, and yet have all the comforts
and necessaries of life provided for them. They enjoy liberty,
because they are oppressed neither by care nor labor. The
Line 30women do little hard work, and are protected from the
despotism of their husbands by their masters. The Negro men
and shout boys work, on the average, in good weather, not
more than nine hours a day. The balance of their time is spent
in perfect abandon. Besides, they have their Sabbaths and 
Line 35holidays. White men, with so much of license and liberty,
would die of ennui; but Negroes with their faces luxuriate in
corporeal and mental repose, upturned to the sun, they can
sleep at any hour; and quiet sleep is the greatest of human
enjoyments. “Blessed be the man who invented sleep.” This
Line 40Happiness in itself – and results from contentment with the
present, and confident assurance of the future. We do not 
know whether free laborers ever sleep. They are fools to do
so; do, whilst they sleep, the wily and watchful capitalist is
devising means to ensnare and exploit them. The free laborer
Line 45must work or starve. He is more of a slave than the Negro,
because he works longer and harder for less allowance than
the slave, and has no holidays, because the cares of life with
him began when its labors end. He has no liberty, and not a 
single right. We know, ’tis often said, air and water, are 
Line 50common property, which all have equal right to participate
and enjoy; but this is utterly false. The Appropriation of the 
lands carries with it the appropriation of all on or above the
lands, “usque ad coelum, etad inferos”. A man cannot breath
the air, without a place to breathe it from, all places are
Line 55appropriated. All water is private property “to the middle of
the stream”, except the ocean, and that is not fit to drink.
Free laborers have not a thousandth part of the rights and
liberties of Negro slaves. Indeed, they have not a single right
or a single liberty, unless it be the right or liberty to die. But
Line 60the reader may think that he and other capitalists and 
employers are freer than Negro slaves. Your capital would 
soon vanish, if you dared indulge in the liberty and abandon
Negroes. You hold your wealth and position by the tenure
of constant watchfulness, care and circumspection. You
Line 65never labor; but you’re never free.
Where a few own the soil, they have unlimited power over
the balance of society, until domestic slavery comes in, to
compel them to permit this balance of society to draw a
sufficient and comfortable living from “terra mater”. Free
Line 70society, asserts the right of a few to the earth – slavery,
maintains that it belongs, in different degrees, to all.
But, reader, well may you follow the slave trade. It is the
only trade worth following, and slaves the only property
worth owning. All other is worthless, a mere caput mutuum,
Line 75except in so far as it vests the owner with the power to
command the labors of others –  to enslave them. Give you a 
palace, ten thousand acres of land, sumptuous clothes,
equipage and every other luxury; and with your artificial 
wants, you are poorer than Robinson Crusoe, or the lowest
Line 80working man, if you have no slaves to capital, or domestic
slaves. Your capital will not bring you an income of a cent
nor supply one of your wants, without labor.

SAT Reading Comprehension Practice Test Questions

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 1

Which choice best describes the structure of the argument presented in this article?

Option A : A thesis is made first, which is followed by counter evidences.

Option B : An analogy is drawn between two issues with their similarities elaborated.

Option C : A new perspective is proven through various concrete comparisons and examples.

Option D : An concept is advanced by the sharps contrast of two warring ideas.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 1

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Option B : An analogy is drawn between two issues with their similarities elaborated.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 2

According to the article, which choice best describes the author’s attitude towards the idea that “free labor is cheaper than slave than labor” in line 5?

Option A : Slavery is no less evil than Capital in exploitation.

Option B : Capital labor is indeed better off than slaves in the South.

Option C : Slavery and Capital oppress us in the same way.

Option D : There is no such thing called the true liberty.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 2

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Option A : Slavery is no less evil than Capital in exploitation.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 3

Which choices provides the best evidence for the answer the previous question?

Option A : Lines 1-3 (“You…slave”)

Option B : Lines 6-8 (“You…master”)

Option C : Lines 10-12 (“Whilst…Trade”)

Option D : Lines 14-19 (“Now…slaves”)

SAT Practice Test Answer No 3

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Option A : Lines 1-3 (“You…slave”)

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 4

As mentioned in line 13, “without being obliged to” most closely means

Option A : one has no need to be responsible for financial compensation.

Option B : the subject is held liable for what he has committed.

Option C : one is made grateful to what he has received from others.

Option D : the subject is required to surrender to other his work.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 4

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Option D : the subject is required to surrender to other his work.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 5

The description of southern slavery life in lines 25-34 serves best to

Option A : denounce its cruelty by mocking it to seem lightly and easy.

Option B : exaggerate the immense burdens put on slaves in daily lives.

Option C : emphasize its atrocity as a preparation for later discussion. 

Option D : underplay the importance of balancing between life and work in slavery.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 5

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Option A : denounce its cruelty by mocking it to seem lightly and easy.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 6

Which choices best describes the tome of the author in his discussion within the second paragraph?

Option A : Lamenting and passionately proclaiming.

Option B : Appreciative and wholly supportive.

Option C : Sarcastic while bitterly criticizing.

Option D : Rational while carefully admonishing.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 6

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Option C : Sarcastic while bitterly criticizing.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 7

The word “corporeal” in line 37 most precisely means

Option A : spiritual.

Option B : corporate.

Option C : physical

Option D : psychological.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 7

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Option C : physical

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 8

The author refers to sleep in his discussion between lines 36-41 mainly in order to

Option A : make his thesis on capital and slavery obvious.

Option B : entertain the idea that sleep is a crucial factor for both capitalism and slavery.

Option C : rationalize the argument that sleep deprivation harms the worker and the slave.

Option D : stress the irony the so-called freedom for workers or slaves does not really exist.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 8

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Option D : stress the irony the so-called freedom for workers or slaves does not really exist.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 9

Which choice provides best describes for the answer to the previous question?

Option A : Lines 39-41 (“This…future”)

Option B : Lines 42-44 (“They…them”)

Option C : Lines 45-49 (“He…right”)

Option D : Lines 51-56 (“The…drink”)

SAT Practice Test Answer No 9

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Option C : Lines 45-49 (“He…right”)

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 10

Starting from line 51, the article shifts its discussion from

Option A : an overall analogical discussion between capital and slavery to one of the key factors.

Option B : a generalization of topics in discussion to a series of more concrete examples.

Option C : an expression of doubt towards capitalism and slavery to a vehement attack of their foundation.

Option D : a warranted suspicion of its rationales behind the stories to its representations in reality.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 10

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Option A : an overall analogical discussion between capital and slavery to one of the key factors.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 11

The first sentences of the third paragraph implies that the author views workers in capitalism as

Option A : companions in the same quest.

Option B : victims of similar crimes.

Option C : competitors of the same goal.

Option D : leaders to guide the cause of action.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 11

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Option B : victims of similar crimes.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 12

The word “tenure” in line 63 can be replaced by

Option A : consistency

Option B : continuity

Option C : persistence

Option D : longevity

SAT Practice Test Answer No 12

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Option B : continuity

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 13

According to the passage, the metaphor used in lines 76-81 can be reasonably inferred as

Option A : a challenge to the current ideology on indulging slavery as an ongoing practice.

Option B : a commentary to the landowner’s ease and comfort.

Option C : a satire to ridicule the slave owners greed and impasse.

Option D : an evocation to conscience by depicting evil and atrocity.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 12

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Option C : a satire to ridicule the slave owners greed and impasse.

SAT Reading Practice Tests List

Complete Guide to SAT Reading Tests
Test 1Test 2Test 3Test 4Test 5
Test 6Test 7Test 8Test 9Test 10
Test 11Test 12Test 13Test 14Test 15
Test 16Test 17Test 18Test 19Test 20
Test 21Test 22Test 23Test 24Test 25
Test 26Test 27Test 28Test 29Test 30
Test 31Test 32Test 33Test 34Test 35
Test 36Test 37Test 38Test 39Test 40
Test 41Test 42Test 43Test 44Test 45
Test 46Test 47Test 48Test 49Test 50
Test 51Test 52Test 53Test 54Test 55