SAT Reading Section Practice Test 63 | SAT 2022 Online Tutor AMBiPi

Hi SAT Aspirants, welcome to AKVTutorials. As you know SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) is a standard test, used for taking admission to undergraduate programs of universities or colleges of United States. SAT is developed and published by the College Board, an organization in United States, administered by the Educational Testing Service. Are you searching for SAT Reading Practice Questions? Then, in this article of AKVTutorials, you will get SAT Reading Prep Test 57 | SAT Reading Section Practice Test 63 | SAT 2022 Online Tutor AMBiPi

SAT Reading Practice Passage

SAT Reading Practice Test Comprehensive Passage

This passage is adapted from David Hume, “Of the Reason of Animals,” an inquiry concerning humans. The understanding following 10 multiple choice questions is based on the passage below.

All our concerning matter of fact are founded on a
species of Analogy, which leads us to expect from any cause
the same events, which we have observed to result from
similar causes. Where the causes are entirely similar, the
Line 5 analogy is perfect, and the inference, drawn from it, is
regarded as certain and conclusive: nor does any man ever
entertain a doubt, where he sees a piece of iron, that it will
have weight and cohesion of parts; as in all other instances,
which have ever fallen under his observation. But where the
Line 10 objects have not so exact a similarity, the analogy is less
perfect, and the inference is less conclusive; though still it
has some force, in proportion to the degree of similarity and
resemblance.
The anatomical observations, formed upon one animal, are,
Line 15 by this species of reasoning, extended to all animals; and it is
certain that when the circulation of the blood, for instance, is 
clearly proved to have place in one creature, as a frog, or fish, it
forms a strong presumption, that the same principle has place in all.
These analogical observations may be carried
Line 20 farther, even to this science, of which we are now treating;
and any theory, by which we explain the operations of the 
understanding, or the origin and connexion of the passions in
man, will acquire additional authority, if we find, that the
same theory is requisite to explain the same phenomena in all
Line 25 other animals. We shall make trial of this, with regard to the
hypothesis, by which we have, in the foregoing discourse,
endeavored to account for all experimental reasonings; and
it is hoped, that this new point of view will serve to confirm
all our former observations.
Line 30 First, It seems evident, that animals, as well as men, learn
many things from experience, and infer, that the same events
will always follow from the same causes. By this principle
they become acquainted with the more obvious properties of
external objects, and gradually, from their birth, up a
Line 35 knowledge of the nature of fire, water, earth, stones, heights,
depths, and of the effects which result from their operation.
The ignorance and inexperience of the young are here plainly
distinguishable from the cunning and sagacity of the old,
who have learned, by long observation, to avoid what hurt
Line 40 them, and to pursue what gave ease or pleasure. A horse, that
has been accustomed to the field, becomes acquainted
with the proper height which he can leap, and will never attempt
what exceeds his force and ability. An old greyhound will
trust the more fatiguing part of the chase to the younger, and
Line 45 will place himself so as to meet the hare in her doubles; nor
are the conjectures, which he forms on this occasion,
founded in any thing but his observation and experience.
This is still more evident from the effects of discipline
education on animals, who, by the proper application of
Line 50 rewards and punishments, may be taught any course of
action, and most contrary to their natural instincts and 
propensities. Is it not experience, which renders a dog
apprehensive of pain, when you menace him, or lift up the 
whip to beat him? Is it not even experience, which makes
Line 55 him answer to his name, and infer, from such an arbitrary
sound, that you mean him rather than any of his fellows, and
intend to call him, when you pronounce it in a certain manner,
and with a certain tone and accent?
In all these cases, we may observe, that the animal infers
Line 60 some fact beyond what immediately strikes his senses; and
that this inference is altogether founded on past experience,
while the creature expects from the present object the same
consequences, which it has always found in its observation to
result from similar objects. Secondly, It is impossible, that
Line 65 this inference of the animal can be founded on any process of
argument or reasoning, by which he concludes, that like
events must follow like objects, and that the course of nature
Will always be regular in its operations. For if there be in
reality any arguments of this nature, they surely lie too
Line 70 abstruse for the observation of such imperfect understandings;
since it may well employ the utmost care and attention of a
philosophic genius to discover and observe them. Animals,
therefore are not guided in these inferences by reasoning:
neither are children; neither are the generality of mankind, in
Line 75 their ordinary actions and conclusions: neither are
philosophers themselves, who, in all the acüve parts of life, are,
 in the main, the same with the vulgar, and are governed by
the same maxims. Nature must have provided some other
principle, of more ready, and more general use and
Line 80 application; nor can an operation of such immense
consequence in life, as that of inferring effects from causes, be
trusted to the uncertain process of reasoning and
argumentation. Were this doubtful with regard to men, it
seems to admit of no question with regard to the brute
Line 85 creation; and the conclusion being once firmly established in
the one, we have a strong presumption, from all the rules of
analogy, that it ought to be universally admitted, without any
exception or reserve.

SAT Reading Comprehension Practice Test Questions

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 1

The structure of the article is best described as

Option A : a phenomenon is discussed in details followed by a theoretical analysis from two varying sources.

Option B : an issue is presented with pros and cons while concrete examples support both prongs.

Option C : a thesis is made with elaboration on its rationales, which leads further to another conclusion.

Option D : an inference is made to justify the seemingly contradictory explanations for the same fact.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 1

Show/Hide Answer

Option C: a thesis is made with elaboration on its rationales, which leads further to another conclusion.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 2

What is the rhetoric that the author uses most pervasively in his discourse?

Option A : Metaphor

Option B : Metaphor

Option C : Satire.

Option D : Simile.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 2

Show/Hide Answer

Option B: Metaphor

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 3

The first paragraph, the author suggests the inference is imperfect when In

Option A : the similarity is less than conclusive. 

Option B : the resemblance is highly recognizable. 

Option C : the coincidence is clearly predictable.

Option D : the accordance is obviously provable.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 3

Show/Hide Answer

Option A: the similarity is less than conclusive. 

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 4

The word “species” in line 15 can be best replaced by

Option A : biologists,

Option B : categories

Option C : colonies.

Option D : groups.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 4

Show/Hide Answer

Option B : categories

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 5

The experiments on frog or fish, suggested by the author, can be best understood as

Option A : lending support to our studies of human physiology and related disciplines.

Option B : showing the research direction on human learning and passion with extra reasoning forces.

Option C : showing the research direction on human learning and passion with extra reasoning forces.

Option D : an additional source of information for our accumulated knowledge of human behaviors.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 5

Show/Hide Answer

Option A : lending support to our studies of human physiology and related disciplines.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 6

Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question?

Option A : Lines 15-19 (“and…all”)

Option B : Lines 15-19 (“and…all”)

Option C : Lines 19-20 (“These…treating”)

Option D :Lines 25-29 (“We. ..observations”)

SAT Practice Test Answer No 6

Show/Hide Answer

Option C : Lines 19-20 (“These…treating”)

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 7

Which choice best characterizes the learning process in the third paragraph?

Option A : Such experience is acquired through time. 

Option B : The learning process is nevertheless natural.

Option C : Rewards and punishments enhance learning effect.

Option D : Humans can separate the obvious from the latent.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 7

Show/Hide Answer

Option C: Rewards and punishments enhance learning effect

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 8

Which choice most closely resembles the examples of horse and greyhound in lines 40-47?

Option A : A seasoned pitcher broke the record in major

Option B : A senior accountant chose an efficient way in auditing.

Option C : A hiking rookie decided to take an obscure route.

Option D : A senior judge ruled to postpone the decision on a case.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 8

Show/Hide Answer

Option B : A senior accountant chose an efficient way in auditing.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 9

The word “discipline” in line 48 most closely means

Option A : control.

Option B : field.

Option C : category.

Option D : cultivation.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 9

Show/Hide Answer

Option D : cultivation.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 10

Starting from line 59, the passage shifts its focus to

Option A : discuss a secondary conclusion drawn from the discourse.

Option B : reverse the previous argument to a new path of discovery.

Option C : extend to cover a completely unrelated learning field.

Option D : resonate with the issue presented in the beginning Of the passage.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 10

Show/Hide Answer

Option A : discuss a secondary conclusion drawn from the discourse.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 11

The assumption for the statement in lines 68-72 is

Option A : that the more convoluted an argument becomes, the more time we must devote to it.

Option B : attentions required that in observation relates positively to the complexity of the reasoning. 

Option C : that the scientific evidence tends to favor the rational treatment of human reasoning process.

Option D : that it is impossible to draw a perfect conclusion from any observation completed without care.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 11

Show/Hide Answer

Option B : attentions required that in observation relates positively to the complexity of the reasoning. 

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 12

In lines 76-78, the author by referring to philosophers and their behaviors tries to

Option A : highlight the difference of thinking between them and normal people.

Option B strengthen the argument that reasoning and argument usually have no place in the inferring process.

Option C :  recognize the limitation of options offered by the nature in finding solutions for reasoning.

Option D : differentiate animal actions and impulses from the rationalized thinking of trained scholars

SAT Practice Test Answer No 12

Show/Hide Answer

Option B : strengthen the argument that reasoning and argument usually have no place in the inferring process.

SAT Reading Practice Test Question No 13

The tone of the whole article can be best viewed as

Option A : subjective.

Option B : playful.

Option C :objective. 

Option D : erudite.

SAT Practice Test Answer No 13

Show/Hide Answer

Option C : objective

SAT Reading Practice Tests List

Complete Guide to SAT Reading Tests
Test 1Test 2Test 3Test 4Test 5
Test 6Test 7Test 8Test 9Test 10
Test 11Test 12Test 13Test 14Test 15
Test 16Test 17Test 18Test 19Test 20
Test 21Test 22Test 23Test 24Test 25
Test 26Test 27Test 28Test 29Test 30
Test 31Test 32Test 33Test 34Test 35
Test 36Test 37Test 38Test 39Test 40
Test 41Test 42Test 43Test 44Test 45
Test 46Test 47Test 48Test 49Test 50
Test 51Test 52Test 53Test 54Test 55
Test 56Test 57Test 58Test 59Test 60
Test 61Test 62Test 63Test 64Test 65
Test 66Test 67Test 68Test 69Test 70
Test 71Test 72Test 73Test 74Test 75
Test 76Test 77Test 78Test 79Test 80
Test 81Test 82Test 83Test 84Test 85
Test 86Test 87Test 88Test 89Test 90

Leave a Reply